Buffalo to Bridgehampton and Beyond….

Written By: Marie Ann Mordeno

 

Newly married with degrees in education, his in Industrial Arts and mine in Speech Pathology, we packed our Volkswagen and traveled to Long Island to start our new lives and careers. We found a lovely apartment in West Babylon. Yet it was truly like being on another planet. I knew one person. The accents, the roads, the diners, the bagels were all foreign to us.

The people we met were very hospitable and were to become longtime friends. Our first invitation to dinner was the Swan Club in Roslyn, which then was a high end restaurant. The next invite was for brunch by a pool in Muttontown. This was on a five acre estate off of Black Rock Road and was followed by a walk in their woods. We thought everyone on Long Island lived like this.

 

After settling in, we realized where we were. Mid island was 60 miles from the city or as we called it New York City. Every major birthday, my mom and I would take a train from Buffalo and stay at the Knickerbocker Hotel and see plays. It was a vacation. Now we lived here and were only 60 miles from the Hamptons. The playground of artists like Pollack and musicians like Paul Simon and great beaches, sunsets and fine dining. We were sold.

 

Our daughters grew up visiting the Hamptons and Montauk on weekends and sometimes we stayed at the Montauk Manor for a few days. We never had a lot of money, yet we were interested in all that the East End had to offer. Usually, a day trip satisfied us.

Our trips always included a stop in Water Mill to the Penny Candy Store, where we bribed the girls with candy and China Dolls and Doll House furniture. They could buy one piece a trip.

 

Art was a destination for us. We would attend art openings or visit the Parrish Museum of Art to see their exhibits. The photoshoots by the stone statues next to the building became a tradition. We each would select one and pose by it.

 

My friends, often had art shows out there. I remember in particular and art opening of Eleanor Meier in Bridgehampton.

We had time to waste and someone whispered, “There is a Kennedy Wedding across the street.” Always star struck, I convinced a few to wait outside the picket fence of this charming Catholic Church, as the bride and groom exited. We spotted Ted Kennedy and Caroline Kennedy. I knew she lived in Sagaponack.

 

A lovely woman came over and offered to share the wedding program. She told us that she was so thrilled to be invited that she wanted to share it with us. The in Memoriam list was long and included President John F. Kennedy, JFK Jr, and Rose Kennedy among others.

 

Of course, a tour of the Jackson Pollack house was a must. It was where he created his amazing work. It still is unbelievable, with the size of his major work, how he was able to paint them from above on ladders.

 

For anyone who is as star struck as I am, you will appreciate that one day we were in line at the East Hampton movie theater and I spotted Christie Brinkley holding hands with Billy Joel.

It was easy to see her, she was very tall and the most beautiful women I had ever seen. A few years later, I saw Billy with Alexa Ray sitting on a bench in front of London Jewelers in East Hampton. A quick stop in the Blue Parrot for nachos with a friend and we were lucky to run into Bobby Flay with his model wife. We were the only four in there. I behaved and refrained from asking for autographs or even noticing them.

 

Music was always a good reason to treck out to Montauk. Ditch Plains ran a series of concerts. It was a perfect venue. We were lucky to see James Taylor with our friends the Gordons and also caught Paul Simon and Edie Brickell on another occasion. Recently, I have written about and became friends with Bakithi Kumalo, who tours with Simon to this day. Paul found him in Soweto for the Graceland album and he actually wrote the riff to You Can Call Me Al. When I mentioned Ditch Plains, BK admitted he was playing bass for Paul at that concert. It is a small world.

 

Our favorite dining destinations included East Hampton Point on Three Mile Harbor Road, Dave’s Grill, Duryeas Deck and The Harvest in Montauk, Pierre’s in Bridgehampton, Starr Boggs in Westhampton on the beach and Della Feminas in East Hampton. We went to events like A Taste of the Hamptons. The most memorable was at Jerry Della Femina and Judith Licht’s mansion. There were many star chefs and wineries represented. Later we stopped at Della Feminas Restaurant. My husband wore a big hat and had a beard and moustache at the time. Several people stopped and asked if he was Dan Rattiner. He loved it. Though he was never a writer, he taught printing the old fashioned way and photography was a class he taught, as well as his avocation.

 

Just a couple more memories. The Cenacle in Water Mill was a convent at the time that hosted events. This stunning estate with gardens and a labyrinth on Mecox Bay was the perfect venue for a talk and book signing by Dava Sobel, author of Galileo’s Daughter, my all-time favorite book. The nuns treated us to wine and cheese when we arrived and made Cappucino and Biscotti for after the talk. The Cenacle was also on a Designer Showcase Tour, so we did get to see the whole building. It has since been sold to a private owner and is not accessible to the public.

 

Longhouse Reserve, the domain of Jack Lenor Larsen, displays the work of 60 artists including de Kooning, Dale Chihuly and Yoko Ono. The gardens and Peter’s Pond as well as the Craft furniture exhibit inside the house was a regular stop. I particularly appreciated Yoko Ono’s white chess set dedicated to PEACE. Exhibits may change from time to time, but it is always a breathtaking walk.

 

Now I have a Facebook page called The Dish on the Chef and write interviews of chefs, many on the east end. I have interviewed Pierre Weber, Todd Jacobs, Craig Atwood and Philippe Corbet. I attend foodie events, especially Dan’s Papers.

Last year, I was lucky to applaud Chef Guy Reuge at Harvest East End and met Gregory Zacharian.  Michael Symon and Katie Lee were also charming and signed their cookbooks at A Taste of the Two Forks.

 

I usually stop in to see Mike Krummenacker at Duck Walk Vineyards in Water Mill on my way out. Weekends they have music playing.

 

I am also a fan of The Affair. Some people say that has changed Montauk. Yes the East End and Montauk have changed, but in many ways for good.  Every year, there are new restaurants and new chefs to visit. Jean Georges at Topping Rose for one. I recently had my birthday dinner at the new restaurant that is

The Arbor in Montauk. My friend and Chef Philippe Corbet presented our party of seven with a delicious dinner and charming hospitality in this stunning new venue. My soninlaw told the story of how that was the Blue Marlin and his first dinner date with my daughter was there.

 

So yes things change in the East End, the Hamptons, Montauk The End, but I think it is only the beginning. It seems like the towns out there are maintaining decorum.  As long as they keep offering beautiful beaches, breathtaking sunsets, fine dining, art, music, theater and culture, I will continue to visit.

Buffalo to Bridgehampton and Beyond

Marie Ann Mordeno

mamordeno@optonline.net

 

Newly married with degrees in education, his in Industrial Arts and mine in Speech Pathology, we packed our Volkswagen and traveled to Long Island to start our new lives and careers. We found a lovely apartment in West Babylon. Yet it was truly like being on another planet. I knew one person. The accents, the roads, the diners, the bagels were all foreign to us.

The people we met were very hospitable and were to become longtime friends. Our first invitation to dinner was the Swan Club in Roslyn, which then was a high end restaurant. The next invite was for brunch by a pool in Muttontown. This was on a five acre estate off of Black Rock Road and was followed by a walk in their woods. We thought everyone on Long Island lived like this.

 

After settling in, we realized where we were. Mid island was 60 miles from the city or as we called it New York City. Every major birthday, my mom and I would take a train from Buffalo and stay at the Knickerbocker Hotel and see plays. It was a vacation. Now we lived here and were only 60 miles from the Hamptons. The playground of artists like Pollack and musicians like Paul Simon and great beaches, sunsets and fine dining. We were sold.

 

Our daughters grew up visiting the Hamptons and Montauk on weekends and sometimes we stayed at the Montauk Manor for a few days. We never had a lot of money, yet we were interested in all that the East End had to offer. Usually, a day trip satisfied us.

Our trips always included a stop in Water Mill to the Penny Candy Store, where we bribed the girls with candy and China Dolls and Doll House furniture. They could buy one piece a trip.

 

Art was a destination for us. We would attend art openings or visit the Parrish Museum of Art to see their exhibits. The photoshoots by the stone statues next to the building became a tradition. We each would select one and pose by it.

 

My friends, often had art shows out there. I remember in particular and art opening of Eleanor Meier in Bridgehampton.

We had time to waste and someone whispered, “There is a Kennedy Wedding across the street.” Always star struck, I convinced a few to wait outside the picket fence of this charming Catholic Church, as the bride and groom exited. We spotted Ted Kennedy and Caroline Kennedy. I knew she lived in Sagaponack.

 

A lovely woman came over and offered to share the wedding program. She told us that she was so thrilled to be invited that she wanted to share it with us. The in Memoriam list was long and included President John F. Kennedy, JFK Jr, and Rose Kennedy among others.

 

Of course, a tour of the Jackson Pollack house was a must. It was where he created his amazing work. It still is unbelievable, with the size of his major work, how he was able to paint them from above on ladders.

 

For anyone who is as star struck as I am, you will appreciate that one day we were in line at the East Hampton movie theater and I spotted Christie Brinkley holding hands with Billy Joel.

It was easy to see her, she was very tall and the most beautiful women I had ever seen. A few years later, I saw Billy with Alexa Ray sitting on a bench in front of London Jewelers in East Hampton. A quick stop in the Blue Parrot for nachos with a friend and we were lucky to run into Bobby Flay with his model wife. We were the only four in there. I behaved and refrained from asking for autographs or even noticing them.

 

Music was always a good reason to treck out to Montauk. Ditch Plains ran a series of concerts. It was a perfect venue. We were lucky to see James Taylor with our friends the Gordons and also caught Paul Simon and Edie Brickell on another occasion. Recently, I have written about and became friends with Bakithi Kumalo, who tours with Simon to this day. Paul found him in Soweto for the Graceland album and he actually wrote the riff to You Can Call Me Al. When I mentioned Ditch Plains, BK admitted he was playing bass for Paul at that concert. It is a small world.

 

Our favorite dining destinations included East Hampton Point on Three Mile Harbor Road, Dave’s Grill, Duryeas Deck and The Harvest in Montauk, Pierre’s in Bridgehampton, Starr Boggs in Westhampton on the beach and Della Feminas in East Hampton. We went to events like A Taste of the Hamptons. The most memorable was at Jerry Della Femina and Judith Licht’s mansion. There were many star chefs and wineries represented. Later we stopped at Della Feminas Restaurant. My husband wore a big hat and had a beard and moustache at the time. Several people stopped and asked if he was Dan Rattiner. He loved it. Though he was never a writer, he taught printing the old fashioned way and photography was a class he taught, as well as his avocation.

 

Just a couple more memories. The Cenacle in Water Mill was a convent at the time that hosted events. This stunning estate with gardens and a labyrinth on Mecox Bay was the perfect venue for a talk and book signing by Dava Sobel, author of Galileo’s Daughter, my all-time favorite book. The nuns treated us to wine and cheese when we arrived and made Cappucino and Biscotti for after the talk. The Cenacle was also on a Designer Showcase Tour, so we did get to see the whole building. It has since been sold to a private owner and is not accessible to the public.

 

Longhouse Reserve, the domain of Jack Lenor Larsen, displays the work of 60 artists including de Kooning, Dale Chihuly and Yoko Ono. The gardens and Peter’s Pond as well as the Craft furniture exhibit inside the house was a regular stop. I particularly appreciated Yoko Ono’s white chess set dedicated to PEACE. Exhibits may change from time to time, but it is always a breathtaking walk.

 

Now I have a Facebook page called The Dish on the Chef and write interviews of chefs, many on the east end. I have interviewed Pierre Weber, Todd Jacobs, Craig Atwood and Philippe Corbet. I attend foodie events, especially Dan’s Papers.

Last year, I was lucky to applaud Chef Guy Reuge at Harvest East End and met Gregory Zacharian.  Michael Symon and Katie Lee were also charming and signed their cookbooks at A Taste of the Two Forks.

 

I usually stop in to see Mike Krummenacker at Duck Walk Vineyards in Water Mill on my way out. Weekends they have music playing.

 

I am also a fan of The Affair. Some people say that has changed Montauk. Yes the East End and Montauk have changed, but in many ways for good.  Every year, there are new restaurants and new chefs to visit. Jean Georges at Topping Rose for one. I recently had my birthday dinner at the new restaurant that is

The Arbor in Montauk. My friend and Chef Philippe Corbet presented our party of seven with a delicious dinner and charming hospitality in this stunning new venue. My soninlaw told the story of how that was the Blue Marlin and his first dinner date with my daughter was there.

 

So yes things change in the East End, the Hamptons, Montauk The End, but I think it is only the beginning. It seems like the towns out there are maintaining decorum.  As long as they keep offering beautiful beaches, breathtaking sunsets, fine dining, art, music, theater and culture, I will continue to visit.

Buffalo to Bridgehampton and Beyond

Marie Ann Mordeno

mamordeno@optonline.net

 

Newly married with degrees in education, his in Industrial Arts and mine in Speech Pathology, we packed our Volkswagen and traveled to Long Island to start our new lives and careers. We found a lovely apartment in West Babylon. Yet it was truly like being on another planet. I knew one person. The accents, the roads, the diners, the bagels were all foreign to us.

The people we met were very hospitable and were to become longtime friends. Our first invitation to dinner was the Swan Club in Roslyn, which then was a high end restaurant. The next invite was for brunch by a pool in Muttontown. This was on a five acre estate off of Black Rock Road and was followed by a walk in their woods. We thought everyone on Long Island lived like this.

 

After settling in, we realized where we were. Mid island was 60 miles from the city or as we called it New York City. Every major birthday, my mom and I would take a train from Buffalo and stay at the Knickerbocker Hotel and see plays. It was a vacation. Now we lived here and were only 60 miles from the Hamptons. The playground of artists like Pollack and musicians like Paul Simon and great beaches, sunsets and fine dining. We were sold.

 

Our daughters grew up visiting the Hamptons and Montauk on weekends and sometimes we stayed at the Montauk Manor for a few days. We never had a lot of money, yet we were interested in all that the East End had to offer. Usually, a day trip satisfied us.

Our trips always included a stop in Water Mill to the Penny Candy Store, where we bribed the girls with candy and China Dolls and Doll House furniture. They could buy one piece a trip.

 

Art was a destination for us. We would attend art openings or visit the Parrish Museum of Art to see their exhibits. The photoshoots by the stone statues next to the building became a tradition. We each would select one and pose by it.

 

My friends, often had art shows out there. I remember in particular and art opening of Eleanor Meier in Bridgehampton.

We had time to waste and someone whispered, “There is a Kennedy Wedding across the street.” Always star struck, I convinced a few to wait outside the picket fence of this charming Catholic Church, as the bride and groom exited. We spotted Ted Kennedy and Caroline Kennedy. I knew she lived in Sagaponack.

 

A lovely woman came over and offered to share the wedding program. She told us that she was so thrilled to be invited that she wanted to share it with us. The in Memoriam list was long and included President John F. Kennedy, JFK Jr, and Rose Kennedy among others.

 

Of course, a tour of the Jackson Pollack house was a must. It was where he created his amazing work. It still is unbelievable, with the size of his major work, how he was able to paint them from above on ladders.

 

For anyone who is as star struck as I am, you will appreciate that one day we were in line at the East Hampton movie theater and I spotted Christie Brinkley holding hands with Billy Joel.

It was easy to see her, she was very tall and the most beautiful women I had ever seen. A few years later, I saw Billy with Alexa Ray sitting on a bench in front of London Jewelers in East Hampton. A quick stop in the Blue Parrot for nachos with a friend and we were lucky to run into Bobby Flay with his model wife. We were the only four in there. I behaved and refrained from asking for autographs or even noticing them.

 

Music was always a good reason to treck out to Montauk. Ditch Plains ran a series of concerts. It was a perfect venue. We were lucky to see James Taylor with our friends the Gordons and also caught Paul Simon and Edie Brickell on another occasion. Recently, I have written about and became friends with Bakithi Kumalo, who tours with Simon to this day. Paul found him in Soweto for the Graceland album and he actually wrote the riff to You Can Call Me Al. When I mentioned Ditch Plains, BK admitted he was playing bass for Paul at that concert. It is a small world.

 

Our favorite dining destinations included East Hampton Point on Three Mile Harbor Road, Dave’s Grill, Duryeas Deck and The Harvest in Montauk, Pierre’s in Bridgehampton, Starr Boggs in Westhampton on the beach and Della Feminas in East Hampton. We went to events like A Taste of the Hamptons. The most memorable was at Jerry Della Femina and Judith Licht’s mansion. There were many star chefs and wineries represented. Later we stopped at Della Feminas Restaurant. My husband wore a big hat and had a beard and moustache at the time. Several people stopped and asked if he was Dan Rattiner. He loved it. Though he was never a writer, he taught printing the old fashioned way and photography was a class he taught, as well as his avocation.

 

Just a couple more memories. The Cenacle in Water Mill was a convent at the time that hosted events. This stunning estate with gardens and a labyrinth on Mecox Bay was the perfect venue for a talk and book signing by Dava Sobel, author of Galileo’s Daughter, my all-time favorite book. The nuns treated us to wine and cheese when we arrived and made Cappucino and Biscotti for after the talk. The Cenacle was also on a Designer Showcase Tour, so we did get to see the whole building. It has since been sold to a private owner and is not accessible to the public.

 

Longhouse Reserve, the domain of Jack Lenor Larsen, displays the work of 60 artists including de Kooning, Dale Chihuly and Yoko Ono. The gardens and Peter’s Pond as well as the Craft furniture exhibit inside the house was a regular stop. I particularly appreciated Yoko Ono’s white chess set dedicated to PEACE. Exhibits may change from time to time, but it is always a breathtaking walk.

 

Now I have a Facebook page called The Dish on the Chef and write interviews of chefs, many on the east end. I have interviewed Pierre Weber, Todd Jacobs, Craig Atwood and Philippe Corbet. I attend foodie events, especially Dan’s Papers.

Last year, I was lucky to applaud Chef Guy Reuge at Harvest East End and met Gregory Zacharian.  Michael Symon and Katie Lee were also charming and signed their cookbooks at A Taste of the Two Forks.

 

I usually stop in to see Mike Krummenacker at Duck Walk Vineyards in Water Mill on my way out. Weekends they have music playing.

 

I am also a fan of The Affair. Some people say that has changed Montauk. Yes the East End and Montauk have changed, but in many ways for good.  Every year, there are new restaurants and new chefs to visit. Jean Georges at Topping Rose for one. I recently had my birthday dinner at the new restaurant that is

The Arbor in Montauk. My friend and Chef Philippe Corbet presented our party of seven with a delicious dinner and charming hospitality in this stunning new venue. My soninlaw told the story of how that was the Blue Marlin and his first dinner date with my daughter was there.

 

So yes things change in the East End, the Hamptons, Montauk The End, but I think it is only the beginning. It seems like the towns out there are maintaining decorum.  As long as they keep offering beautiful beaches, breathtaking sunsets, fine dining, art, music, theater and culture, I will continue to visit.

It is truly another world from Buffalo, but it is now my world.vv

It is truly another world from Buffalo, but it is now my world.

It is truly another world from Buffalo, but it is now my world.